State regulators have been conducting “cursory and indifferent” investigations of complaints against caregivers for the elderly, disabled and sick, even when those cases involve suspected abuse or suspicious death, according to an investigation by the Center for Investigative Reporting and KQED. Documents obtained by CIR also reveal the California Department of Public Health dismissed nearly 1,000 pending cases of abuse and theft over the past decade, when the state was dealing with a backlog of cases.

Guests:
Ryan Gabrielson, senior reporter at the Center for Investigative Reporting who led the investigation into this story
Mina Kim, reporter for KQED News who contributed to this story

  • Colette Tanaka

    The problem of elder abuse investigation and prosecution is symptomatic
    of the legal and justice system, and society in general.

    1.
    Laws on
    the books that you are unable to enforce.
    Reinforces the idea that the law only works for those who have the money
    to enforce or challenge it—not for the weakest, most vulnerable members of
    society.

    2.
    Not only do prosecutors have to do the hard
    tedious work collecting evidence against abusers but they have to fight a
    system that will not support or is indifferent to prosecution. Further, socializing between probate lawyers
    and the bench conspires to save court time, save careers and deny
    justice.

    Getting old in America—don’t get sick, don’t fall, save up
    your pills

  • Monica evensen

    Ryan Gabrielson is truly a voice for the voiceless and I admire his work tremendously. Mina Kim’s comment on the other hand that: “relatives could visit frequently and at different times” was in stark contrast to Ryan’s research. The comment was an insult to all the relatives that have suffered neglect or abuse.

    As Ryan’s investigation clearly shows that not even in severe cases of abuse, not even when the care facility reports abuse, is the patient/client protected. What is it Mina suggests that the relatives can do? Move their relative to another care home, that is also under the same supervision? It was a senseless comment that showed arrogance to Ryan’s investigation.

  • Mr. Gabrielson,

    This is in response to your “Quick Dismissal of Caregiver Abuse Cases Puts Calif. Patients at Risk.”

    It’s great that you too are exposing these facts about CDPH’s complicity in elder abuse in California. Very few reporters are covering this dirty secret.

    Do you want to know why nursing home death case referrals to the California attorney general’s office are down? California AG Kamala Harris and Mark Zahner, the immediate past chief of prosecutions for the AG’s Bureau of Medi-Cal Fraud and Elder Abuse (BMFEA), in the Department of Justice, have shameful records as elder abuse prosecutors.

    Check out on our site (see our username here) our July 31, 2013 article “Mark Zahner, CA DOJ’s Chief Elder Abuse Prosecutor, Resigns amid Criticism.”

    In this article, please read what we are about to expose on our website about Mr. Zahner and the DOJ’s BMFEA.

    But right now in our brand-new, three-part exposé, we are blowing the lid off 17 secrets that the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), the U.S. government agency that administers the nation’s health insurance programs known as Medicare and Medicaid, does not want the public to know about CMS’s Five-Star Quality Rating System on its nationally promoted, frequently visited Nursing Home Compare website.

    This in-depth, thoroughly documented, three-part series explores whether or not Medicare’s five-star rating system for the more than 15,000 Medicare- and Medicaid-certified nursing homes in the U.S. can be considered a fraud on the public searching for facilities that won’t kill our parents and grandparents.

    The series, which will include Part 2 and Part 3 within the next week or two, covers the reliability and accuracy of the information and star ratings on CMS’s Nursing Home Compare.

    Medicare’s Nursing Home Compare Five-Star Rating System: A Fraud on the Public?
    September 10, 2013.

  • Guest

    Mr. Gabrielson,

    This is in response to your “Quick Dismissal of Caregiver Abuse Cases Puts Calif. Patients at Risk.”

    It’s great that you too are exposing these facts about CDPH’s complicity in elder abuse in California. Very few reporters are covering this dirty secret.

    Do you want to know why nursing home death case referrals to the California attorney general’s office are down? California AG
    Kamala Harris and Mark Zahner, the immediate past chief of prosecutions for the AG’s Bureau of Medi-Cal Fraud and Elder Abuse (BMFEA), in the Department of Justice, have shameful records as elder abuse prosecutors.

    Check out on our site (see our username here) our July 31, 2013 article “Mark Zahner, CA DOJ’s Chief Elder Abuse Prosecutor, Resigns amid Criticism.”

    In this article, please read what we are about to expose on our website about Mr. Zahner and the DOJ’s BMFEA.

  • benamarine

    Elder Abuse, Financial Elder Abuse, Fraud, Undue Influence, Conspiracy, Theft

    “Who didn’t I tell?”

    benamarine.blogspot.com

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