(Kris Krug/Wikimedia Commons)

Saul Griffith is an inventor whose designs look like they’re straight out of science fiction: wind turbines that float like kites, and inflatable robots that resemble walking animal balloons. The San Francisco-based co-founder of Squid Labs talks about his latest creations, his comic book for inventive kids, and his vision for the future of renewable energy. It’s part of Forum’s “First Person” series where we talk to the leaders and thinkers who make the Bay Area unique.

Interview Highlights

 

 

Guests:
Saul Griffith, inventor, engineer and entrepreneur; founder of Otherlab; and recipient of the 2007 MacArthur "genius" grant

  • William – SF

    Can Saul talk more about ideas related to ameliorating climate change?

  • Mare Bear

    It’s wonderful to see what you and your teams are doing. Can you help with working on the climate change problem, and how we can address the over population problem? Maybe work with Rocky Mountain Institute to roll out options around the world?

  • Livegreen

    Scott and Saul, I’m surprised two intelligent people just gave blanket endorsement to all cheap “renewable” products without a blink of consideration to the full life cycle. Cheap solar panels are not automatically good if coal is being used to make them, and heavy metals are being dumped into the oceans as a biproduct.

    It sounds like you’ve given a blanket endorsement to green washing.

    • Livegreen

      On a lighter note, could Saul give more detail about why the high altitude plane wind power is cheaper, and how it works? (In laymen’s terms).

  • Blaine Johnson

    Climate change has always happened and is most certainly going to continue for the near future simply due to the natural carbon cycle. Do you think that we are close to controlling global warming whether natural or man made?

    • Mare Bear

      if we can control human overpopulation and human behavior, we can at least stop the very worst of climate change.

      • Blaine Johnson

        In general, people will never stop breeding. I have a very simple idea to alleviate the impact and reduce or end many other issues along the way, but people scream about civil rights every time I bring it up. Good luck with that battle.

        • Richard Haven

          Let me guess: involuntary sterilization.

          And you get to set the criteria.

          • Blaine Johnson

            Close Richard. No space for detail, but it would be VOLUNTARY and TEMPORARY with incentives (and/or penalty depending on point of view of individual issues) And NO other criteria but ‘the physical ability to reproduce’.

          • Richard Haven

            Wild guess: you are a Libertarian, yes?

          • Blaine Johnson

            I do not belong to any political party. Do Libertarians believe in such ideas? I do not think they like government programs, do they?

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