(Eric Risberg-Pool/Getty Images)

California regulators want to penalize PG&E $2.25 billion for the 2010 San Bruno gas line explosion that killed eight people and injured 66. California Public Utility Commission staff recommended the hefty fine, which would be the largest penalty ever brought by a state regulator in the U.S., citing the severity of the damage and PG&E’s “reprehensible” failures. Forum discusses the proposed penalty and what has changed since the deadly blast.

Interview Highlights

Guests:
Jerry Hill, California state senator representing the 13th District, which includes San Bruno
Marcel Hawiger, staff attorney for The Utility Reform Network (TURN)
Jim Ruane, mayor of San Bruno
Mike Florio, commissioner for the California Public Utilities Commission

  • Marcel

    There was a documentary made about the San Bruno fire, called Trial By Fire, that I know was shown locally. Oddly though the San Mateo county library system doesn’t have a copy of the DVD and this documentary’s not on Youtube.
    http://www.nbcbayarea.com/news/local/Documentary-Airs-on-San-Bruno-Fire-Trial-By-Fire-168820086.html

  • Amanda Stupi

    Thanks for sharing Marcel.

  • Sam Badger

    2.25 billion is actually too low for such a terrible disaster. The company should have been seized by the State as soon as the explosion happened and its records combed for signs of similar problems in their infrastructure to prevent it from happening again. Corporations should no longer be treated as a way for wealthy people to make money without any culpability for the actions of the corporations – if I own a dog and it bites people’s children, the government can put down that dog, but if a shareholder invests in a business that kills people, the worst thing that will happen to them is that their stock dividends will be moderately reduced for one year. If your business kills people out of greed and negligence, you don’t deserve to own that business.

  • cigol

    Are there criminal charges involved?
    If not, it is rather meaningless.

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