(Scott Walton/KQED)

KQED has teamed up with the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation and Public Radio Exchange (PRX) to launch Matter Ventures, a start-up accelerator designed to foster media innovation. Popular in Silicon Valley, start-up accelerators offer investment, mentoring and other assistance to entrepreneurs. But can such a model work for public media?

Guests:
John Boland, president and CEO of KQED Public Media
Corey Ford, CEO and partner, Matter Ventures
Ken Doctor, news industry analyst for Outsell and author of "Newsonomics: Twelve New Trends That Will Shape the News You Get"

  • Dave

    innovators should leverage two trends that favor your medium:
    1. usability is king: it’s easier to turn on a radio than it is to tune into a podcast
    2. more workers than ever (in this market) are working individually or in small groups, and talk radio as a passive social outlet (replacing the water cooler) has a lot of psychological value

  • KQED Forum is my favorite podcasting source. Everything well described in the archive and accessible from the calender. If they decide to monetize it, I can envision something like the Amazon 99 cents per track (99 cents per show) concept rather than something like a membership. I get shows from many sources. Maybe there could be a centralized credit card system that offers tokens, like 21 tokens for $20 to be used at a wide variety of participating sites. I remember a web site that had a token system. Just a thought, but I’m glad it’s free and easy to access. I also access the Diane Rehm show, but only 1 of her 2 hours are available for download. One must sit at computer to stream the other, as far as I know. I’m a custodian who works night shift and enjoy listening to enlightening shows during work.

Sponsored by

Become a KQED sponsor