(Wikimedia Commons)

“Sexy Beast.” That’s how Martin Amis refers to the title character of his latest novel, “Lionel Asbo: State of England.” His creation, Lionel, is a gangster with a love for extortion, topless models and feeding his dogs Tabasco sauce. But he’s also got a soft spot for his bookish young nephew. Martin Amis joins us to discuss his latest novel, and his love for misbehaving characters.

Guests:
Martin Amis, author of "Lionel Asbo: State of England," and of other books including "The Rachel Papers," "Money" and "London Fields"

  • RA

    The Hitchens stuff was interesting, but the anti-Romney-ism is dismissive and pretty hateful.  Ideological rather than analytical, imo.

    • patricio

       …but also accurate.  It was great to hear a non-american’s (and intelligent at that) take on American’s politics.  Genius how he said as the US is the most powerful country in the world, we should elect a president accordingly (i.e. vote for someone who can lead the world).

      • RA

         Yup.   Absolutely…  Romney should be ridiculed because when he goes to Jerusalem he’ll think that Eden is in Missouri.    Not only is that a ridiculous criticism (where does Obama think “Eden” is? )   it also shows a lack of understanding of the Mormon claims on the subject (according to wikipedia anyway).   In my book those things together kind of bring the whole “intellectual” thing into question and suggest political blowhard a la Limbaugh instead.

  • Norma Carrell

    Did anyone get the author and name of book he was referring to early in the interview saying it was the greatest novel ever.  That after reading it he wasn’t sure he could write on that level.?? anyone recall that info?

    • RA

      i think it is:
       http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Adventures_of_Augie_March
      by Saul Bellow

      (never heard of him or it. maybe i shouldn’t admit that ? )

  • fotd

    Nice interview. I’ll be reading the book though I’m not sure I like the author. Though I doubt he cares, Amis impressed me as smug and narrow minded in his intellectualism. Maybe Krasny brought that out as they are clearly birds of a feather sharing the same literary friends. A little sparring might have helped. But I loved the way he used language and, although it was overdone, his use of quotes generally struck me as descriptive and pertinent.

  • MattCA12

    Amis is one of the world’s greatest living novelists.  Check out his London Trilogy for the definitive examination of modern man’s struggle against the absurdities of life.  His take on Romney is both accurate and hilarious.  Perhaps the Mormons could obviate the whole Jerusalem question by convincing Arabs and Jews that the Holy Land is in Missouri.

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