(Wikimedia Commons)

Judy Blume’s novels for children and young adults have sold more than 80 million copies — and many women consider her an integral part of their coming of age. Blume has tackled controversial subjects such as racism, religion and masturbation. Now, for the first time, Blume is seeing one of her novels turned into a movie. Her son, film director Lawrence Blume has brought “Tiger Eyes” to the big screen.

Guests:
Judy Blume, author of numerous works of teen fiction, including "Tiger Eyes"
Lawrence Blume, director and co-writer of "Tiger Eyes," a film based on the novel by his mother, showing at the 2012 San Francisco Jewish Film Festival

  • Savvyink

    Question for Judy Blume (my hero!):  I’ve been working on a teen novel about growing up with an alcoholic parent and I’m struggling with the era.  I want to make it current, but the technology is evolving so quickly.  Girls no longer stay home waiting for the phone to ring, there is a wealth of personal information exchanged on Facebook, relationships can start and end thru text messages, etc. I’m afraid that if I try to make my story modern-day, it will ring false (I’m 49), but if I place in the 70s  when I was growing up, will today’s kids want to read it?   I know my themes (dysfuctional family, heartache, teenage angst) are still relevant, but how kids communicate today is so different…

    Thanks,
    Lisa Lyon
    Montara, CA

  • It seemed like each stage of being a girl and then a teenager was matched to one of Blume’s stories, comprising a serialization of a girl’s life. I read a lot and was encouraged by my mother to read anything, and these books were the most honest, poignant, empathetic depictions to be found.

  • Vmross14

    Given her popularity why isn’t the film being released wider from a major studio?

  • Gutsy4

    I am curious about the connection to the Jewish Film Festival. It doesn’t sound like there is any Jewish content in Tiger Eyes? Is there?

    Susan in San Jose

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