(David Paul Morris/Getty Images)

The morning after the June primary election, we check in with a few of our favorite political junkies about the results, and ask how California fared using the new “top-two” primary system. We’ll discuss the outcomes of key races and hot ballot measures like the cigarette tax, pensions in San Jose and funding for San Francisco’s Coit Tower.

Guests:
Corey Cook, assistant professor of politics and director of the Leo McCarthy Center for Public Service and the Common Good at the University of San Francisco
Lisa Vorderbrueggen, political reporter and columnist for the Contra Costa Times
John Myers, political editor for KXTV in Sacramento
Mina Kim, reporter for KQED News

  • Dean

    CA-15: A guest mentioned whether ideologues would be able to vote for a member of the other party. In CA-15 Stark got 42%, Swalwell got 36, and Pareja (a tea party independent) got 22%. Does anyone want to venture a guess as too what portion of Pareja’s vote can’t vote D because of ideology? My ow guess is not a very large portion, since they tend to disdain Stark. 1/5, 1/4 of those who voted Pareja can’t vote D?

  • Noelle

    Yes, kiss the Green Party, Peace & Freedom Party, American Independent Party and Libertarian Party goodbye!
    Thanks a lot Abel Maldonado.(
    from A disgruntled Green Party member)

  • remi

    i disagree with the guest (i think he was on the phone — and i’m sorry, i didn’t catch his name as i can late to the show), who opined that different voters show up for the presidential election than those who vote in the primaries…people who vote, tend to vote in every election.  

    • remi

       meant “came” not can — 

  • George

    Every day I hear complaints about legislators being swayed by the big corporations’ money and lobbyists. Yet, when the big tobacco companies dump millions of dollars on California voters, the voters are just as happy to fall in line.

  • remi

    great so i’ve just been called an old , rich coot. thanks.

  • Ross

    I’m not going to stop voting because third parties have been cut out. I’m planning to move to another state after I get my degreee.

  • The main reason to support the open primary is because it’s more fair than the closed primary process. It puts control of the primary process in the hands of the people rather than the parties and it provides independents, the fastest growing part of the electorate, with the right to participate.

    Minor parties whine about being excluded, but they’re not – they participate in the primary on the same terms as everyone else and so have their fair shot. The open primary is a huge step forward for electoral fairness and California deserves great credit for implementing it.Tony

  • George_San_Jose

    Progressives!  Fed up with Obama the Democrats?  Don’t know who to vote for any more, now that the 1% controls everything?
     
    Consider casting a vote for independent former Mayor of Salt Lake City Rocky Anderson, an actual Progressive who backs his ideals up with deeds rather that just Democratic mambly-pambly mumbling.  Rocky Anderson — remember, he’s the guy who wanted to impeach W for misleading statements made during the lead in to the Iraq war  — Anderson is now running for President of the United States.  True, he almost certainly won’t win; but a vote for Rocky Anderson will send a strong message that we aren’t gonna take it any more.  We aren’t gonna take what the Democrats have been dishing out to the 99%.  We’re gonna vote our values going forward.  And that ain’t the bought and paid for Democrats.

  • The main reason to support an open primary is because it’s more fair than the closed primary process. It puts control of the primary process in the hands of the people rather than the parties and it provides independents, the fastest growing part of the electorate, with the right to participate in the primary process.

    Minor parties whine about being excluded, but they’re not – they participate in the primary on the same terms as everyone else and so have their fair shot. The open primary is a huge step forward for electoral fairness and California deserves a great deal of credit for implementing it.Tony

  • utera

    open primary + spanish on the ballot as well= nightmare for the eyes, they seriously need to stop printing these bilingual ballots.

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