(Wikimedia Commons)

U.S. Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Margaret Hamburg joins us to discuss the role of the FDA in protecting public health, how the agency approves new drugs and her views on what she calls “smart regulation.”

Guests:
Margaret Hamburg, commissioner with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration

  • Blake

    This appears to be the same Margaret Hamburg who has tried to get rid of conflict of interest laws, which exist to protect the public from the inevitable and disgusting corruption and its destructive effects that come about when captured regulators, acting on orders from former and future employers, remove or eviscerate regulations that exist to protect public health and the environment from the reckless, short-sighted actions of corporations and its lackeys such as Hamburg.

  • Genevieve

    WHY??  The FDA scrapped its three-decade-long effort to regulate the use of the popular human antibiotics penicillin and tetracycline in livestock. While the FDA says in the announcement that it “remains concerned about the issue of antimicrobial resistance,” it also says “contested, formal withdrawal proceedings” consume too much of its time and money. For example, withdrawing nitrofurans from livestock use took 20 years, DES (diethylstilbestrol) took seven years and enrofloxacin took five years and cost $3.3 million, says the agency. Hey, we’re just the government that makes the laws and enforces them. They’re Big Meat!  And days after the penicillin announcement, there was another concession. The FDA issued new, watered down rules on the use of cephalosporins in livestock (a different type of antibiotic) after Big Meat muscled down the FDA’s original order to prohibit cephalosporins in 2008 (which also disappeared with little explanation). Cephalosporins are antibiotics like Cefzil and Keflex used for pneumonia, strep throat, salmonella and skin and urinary tract infections in humans and one type of antibiotic that Clostridium difficile is developing tolerance to. Over a million human salmonella infections occur in the US every year, resulting in 16,000 people being hospitalized and nearly 600 deaths, reported the Harford Advocate. 

    http://www.truth-out.org/scary-danger-meat-even-those-who-dont-eat-it/1328373353 

  • Blake

    Didn’t the FDA give the green light to aspartame even after it was shown
    to be cancer-causing, due to political pressure by a self-serving
    party named Donald Rumsfeld? Seems like an agency with less integrity than it should have.

  • JoinElfity

    WHY??  The FDA scrapped its three-decade-long effort to regulate the use of the popular human antibiotics penicillin and tetracycline in livestock. While the FDA says in the announcement that it “remains concerned about the issue of antimicrobial resistance,” it also says “contested, formal withdrawal proceedings” consume too much of its time and money. For example, withdrawing nitrofurans from livestock use took 20 years, DES (diethylstilbestrol) took seven years and enrofloxacin took five years and cost $3.3 million, says the agency. Hey, we’re just the government that makes the laws and enforces them. They’re Big Meat! And days after the penicillin announcement, there was another concession. The FDA issued new, watered down rules on the use of cephalosporins in livestock (a different type of antibiotic) after Big Meat muscled down the FDA’s original order to prohibit cephalosporins in 2008 (which also disappeared with little explanation). Cephalosporins are antibiotics like Cefzil and Keflex used for pneumonia, strep throat, salmonella and skin and urinary tract infections in humans and one type of antibiotic that Clostridium difficile is developing tolerance to. Over a million human salmonella infections occur in the US every year, resulting in 16,000 people being hospitalized and nearly 600 deaths, reported the Harford Advocate. 

  • Bennet

    12:20. Political double speak on low glucose suspend and better CGM both are approve around the world but not inside the red tape of the beltway. She talks about AP but the first step LGS cant get past FDA. Talk is cheap. Kids and teens meanwhile, as the caller points out are losing their lives as Margaret fiddles. 

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