Andrea Aust

Andrea is the Senior Manager of Science Education for KQED. In addition to QUEST, she's had the pleasure of coordinating education and outreach for the public television series Jean-Michel Cousteau: Ocean Adventures and the four-hour documentary Saving the Bay. Andrea graduated from UC Berkeley with a B.A. in Environmental Science and earned her M.A. in Teaching and Multiple Subject Teaching Credential from the University of San Francisco. Prior to KQED, she taught, developed, and managed marine science and environmental education programs in Aspen, Catalina Island and the Bay Area. Follow her on Twitter at @KQEDaust.

Giant Sequoias Struggle with Drought

In the summer of 2014, biologist Nathan Stephenson was surveying giant sequoias in a clearing in Sequoia National Park. He looked up at the crown of a mature giant sequoia, hundreds of years old, and noticed that half of its leaves had turned brown. In 35 years studying giant sequoias in

Homegrown Particle Accelerators

More is more – nowhere is that truer than at the world's most powerful atom smasher, the Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland, where scientists last week concluded a six-month series of experiments where they forced infinitesimally tiny particles to smash against each other at double the energy level ever

Life by the Tide (excerpt)

In his debut film, Life by the Tide, San Francisco filmmaker Joshua Cassidy takes an intimate look into the tide pools at the Fitzgerald Marine Reserve in Moss Beach, CA. QUEST features an excerpt of Cassidy's film.

The Secret Life of a Raindrop

According to a widely held belief, you can't squeeze water from a rock. But researchers from UC Berkeley who are trying to better understand where water is stored in nature are challenging that old adage. After nearly ten years of studying a steep, 20-square-mile area near the South

Mercury in San Francisco Bay

Dr. Jane Hightower's sick patients weren't getting better, and she wanted to know why. Some of the California Pacific Medical Center physician's well-heeled patients were coming into her clinic complaining of fatigue, or trouble thinking – an on-and-off feeling of not being well. Sometimes it was problems with vision, hearing, nausea

Mercury in San Francisco Bay

Dr. Jane Hightower's sick patients weren't getting better, and she wanted to know why. Some of the California Pacific Medical Center physician's well-heeled patients were coming into her clinic complaining of fatigue, or trouble thinking – an on-and-off feeling of not being well. Sometimes it was problems with vision, hearing, nausea

Sidelined: Sports Concussions

It's football season, but this fall there won't be as many hard-hitting practices in California. In January, a new state law, signed last year by Gov. Jerry Brown, took effect, limiting full-contact practice for middle and high-school students to twice per week, and requiring any student who suffered a concussion

Sidelined: Sports Concussions

It's football season, but this fall there won't be as many hard-hitting practices in California. In January, a new state law, signed last year by Gov. Jerry Brown, took effect, limiting full-contact practice for middle and high-school students to twice per week, and requiring any student who suffered a concussion

#EngineerThat

The world is full of interesting problems to solve. We are all constantly observing and assessing what's not working around us, and thinking of ways to improve it. That is the heart of engineering: being curious about a problem, investigating potential solutions, and designing and testing those solutions. KQED is inviting youth, ...read more

The Hayward Fault: Overdue for Disaster

Every year around this time, millions of people around the world participate in The Great California ShakeOut. It's an opportunity for communities to think about one very unpleasant fact: big earthquakes can and do happen. The ShakeOut happens this month because here in California, it's “<a target="_self" href="http://ww2.kqed.org/science/2015/10/08/its-earthquake-season-join-californias-great-shakeout/" ...read more

What Should (And Shouldn’t) Students Be Allowed to Create for Science Projects?

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3mW4w0Y1OXE?version=3&rel=1&fs=1&showsearch=0&showinfo=1&iv_load_policy=1&wmode=transparent&w=640&h=390] Featured Video: Irving MacArthur student arrested after bringing homemade clock to school (The Dallas Morning News) Ahmed Mohamed, an Irving MacArthur High student who invents as a hobby, talks about being detained and interrogated after bringing a homemade clock to school that ...read more

What Would You Study About the Ocean?

The health of our oceans impacts all of us, whether we live near the coast or in the middle of the country. If you were to study an issue related to marine ecosystems or ocean science, what would it be?

E-book: Engineering Is Bringing Fish Up from the Deep

The new, media-rich e-book from QUEST, Engineering Is Bringing Fish Up from the Deep, explores the story of how Academy scientists designed a portable decompression chamber in order to safely transport fish discovered on their expeditions to the Philippines.

E-book: Engineering Is Diagnosing Diseases with Origami Microscopes

The new, media-rich e-book from QUEST, Engineering Is Diagnosing Diseases with Origami Microscopes, tells the story of how Stanford University bioengineer Manu Prakash and his colleagues designed a lightweight, inexpensive, robust, paper microscope in order to help people in developing countries and remote areas diagnose diseases.