Remember Webvan? I do. Actually, I feel wistful. For those who don’t remember, Webvan was one of those overly ambitious dot com start-ups, it’s financial picture was a mess. Analysts said it was years ahead of its time.

My experience was of a grocery delivery service that really delivered. Short delivery windows made it easy to schedule. The quality of products, especially produce was amazing, the friendliness and courtesy of the drivers was unparalleled. They actually unpacked the groceries for you!

In my dreams I am still being delivered those huge baking potatoes and that wasabi tobiko and not schlepping heavy sacks of flour and sugar up the stairs to my apartment. Ah, those were the days! Truth is, as much as I love shopping for groceries and I do, sometimes home delivery just makes more sense.

Since the demise of Webvan in 2001 I have been a loyal customer of Capay Farm’s home delivery program called “Farm Fresh to You”. Once a month I get a carton of 9-10 seasonal organic fruits and vegetables delivered to my doorstep. The produce comes from small, sustainable family farms and helps me feel like I am doing something to support the good guys. It also ensures that I will get a variety of produce I might or might not try if I was the one doing the shopping.

There are several companies that deliver fresh produce directly to homes and offices in the Bay Area, prices and delivery areas vary–here are a few to consider:

Capay Farms/Farm Fresh To You

Eatwell Farms

Planet Organics

Organic Express (the Box)

WestSide Organics

  • wendygee

    Do you know how the various companies you listed compare in terms of quality? Why did you choose Capay Farms over the others?

  • Amy Sherman

    This question comes up all the time on some of the food forums and bulletin boards. I don’t think there is really a definitive answer. I had heard good things about Capay but I’ve heard good things about the others as well.

    I think the area they deliver, the variety of produce and price vary slightly and some require you to purchase more frequently than others.

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