Darrin Bell’s ‘Candorville’ a Comics-Page Commentary on Trump Policies

Darrin Bells Candorville tackled the issue of voter suppression in 2008

Darrin Bells Candorville tackled the issue of voter suppression in 2008. (Photo: Courtesy of Darrin Bell)

President Trump says he has a “running war with the media,” and that might as well include the funny pages. Comic strip artists have authored some of the sharpest political commentary directed against the President and his policies.

Darrin Bell's 'Candorville' is one of the fiercest and funniest comic-page critics of President Donald Trump.
Darrin Bell’s ‘Candorville’ is one of the fiercest and funniest comic-page critics of President Donald Trump. (Photo: Courtesy of Darrin Bell)

“Never normalize him,” says cartoonist Darrin Bell, the creator of Candorville, a daily strip that has frequently mocked the President as well as his predecessors, and often explores race and gender issues. “I gave him the benefit of the doubt, until he launched his campaign by calling Mexican illegal immigrants ‘rapists’ and ‘murderers,’ and it only got worse from there.”

Bell launched Candorville in 2003, and it now appears in more than 100 newspapers around the country, including the San Francisco Chronicle and the San Jose Mercury News. The Los Angeles resident and University of California Berkeley grad recently won the 2016 Clifford K. and James T. Berryman Award for the editorial cartoons he also draws for the Washington Post.

Bell is both African American and Jewish, an identity that he says makes him one of the first people in the room to recognize Trump’s bigotry. “Or maybe it’s more accurate to say I’m the last one in the room who has the luxury of ignoring it,” Bell says. “And Donald Trump’s actions have been screaming bigotry long before he insisted the first black president produce not only his birth certificate, but his college transcripts and his college application. Trump’s actions have been screaming bigotry ever since his company denied housing to minorities in the 1970s.”

Multi-racial cast of characters

Candorville features a multi-racial cast, headed by Bell’s alter-ego, Lemont Brown, an African American single dad and deeply committed Trekkie and science nerd. Brown is also a freelance reporter, giving Bell the chance to comment on Trump’s antipathy for journalists.

Candorville's Lemont Brown is a freelance reporter who spends a lot of time with his friends Susan Garcia and Clyde, the street hustler
Candorville’s Lemont Brown is a freelance reporter who spends a lot of time with his friends Susan and Clyde, an ad executive and a street hustler. (Photo: Courtesy of Darrin Bell)

“Lemont felt that being insulted by Trump was a rite of passage,” Bell says. “He wasn’t actually a real journalist until he made it happen. But after he was forcibly ejected by his underwear from a press conference, Trump hasn’t so much as called him a ‘loser’ once.”

Brown spends a lot of time hanging out with his friends from childhood, Susan Garcia, an ad executive, and Clyde, a street hustler. In one of the most memorable strips, Clyde talks about getting back at a Trump supporter who calls him the “N” word.

Clyde the street hustler shows a remarkable sophistication about street politics
Clyde the street hustler shows a remarkable sophistication about street politics. (Photo: Courtesy of Darrin Bell)

“I had my most cynical character live out exactly how I thought I would deal with that kind of harassment if it were to happen to me,” Bell says. “And as I often do with Clyde, I used it as an opportunity to challenge readers’ preconceptions about people who look like Clyde.”

Comics not always a place for politics

The comics pages were once off-limits for political commentary. But in the 1950s, Walt Kelly’s Pogo took on red-baiting Senator Joseph McCarthy and then-Congressman Richard Nixon. (Kelly later caricatured Nixon, by then president, as a spider, spinning webs of deceit, and Vice President Spiro Agnew as a hyena).

100Days_300x300z

Charles Schulz’s Peanuts tackled race in its characteristically gentle way; and Gary Trudeau has been lampooning political figures (starting with Nixon) in Doonesbury since it was first syndicated in 1970, often earning the strip banishment to the editorial pages. Bell’s contemporary Keith Knight, another African American cartoonist, also writes about politics in his daily strip The Knight Life. 

Doonesbury was a harsh critic of Richard Nixon during the Watergate hearings
Doonesbury was a harsh critic of Richard Nixon during the Watergate hearings. (Photo: Courtesy of Gary Trudeau)

But Bell says he doesn’t owe a debt to these pioneers only. He cites as inspiration the neglected work of Jay Jackson, who created the strip Bungleton Green for the Chicago Defender, America’s top black newspaper in the 1930s, as well as artists outside the world of cartooning.

“I feel like we all owe a debt to Honoré Daumier, to Mark Twain, to the court jester, to Aristophanes,” Bell says. “We actually all owe a debt to the very first hairy person who drew a funny picture on a cave wall about a mammoth-hunt gone wrong.”

Candorville comments on the history of politics in comic strips
Candorville comments on the history of politics in comic strips (Photo: Courtesy of Darrin Bell)

As well as seeing cartooning as one of the oldest art forms, he also considers it to have a long future. “32,000 years from now, long after all of us are completely forgotten, political satire will still be there,” Bell says. “Because humanity will always, always produce smart-asses.”

Darrin Bell’s ‘Candorville’ a Comics-Page Commentary on Trump Policies 8 February,2017Cy Musiker

Author

Cy Musiker

Cy Musiker co-hosts The Do List and covers the arts for KQED News and The California Report.  He loves live performance, especially great theater, jazz, roots music, anything by Mahler. Cy has an MJ from UC Berkeley’s School of Journalism, and got his BA from Hampshire College. His work has been recognized by the Society for Professional Journalists with their Sigma Delta Chi Award for Public Service in Journalism. When he can, Cy likes to swim in Tomales Bay, run with his dog in the East Bay Hills, and hike the Sierra.

Sponsored by

Become a KQED sponsor