Robin Williams, Groundbreaking Comedian and Actor, Dead at 63

Actor Robin Williams (Photo by Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images)

Actor Robin Williams (Photo by Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images)

Legendary comic and actor Robin Williams was found dead Monday morning in his Tiburon home in an apparent suicide, according to the Marin County Sheriff’s department. He was 63.

Though the cause of death was still pending as of Monday afternoon, but the Marin County Coroner’s office was reported saying a preliminary investigation found Williams had died of suicide by asphyxiation. An autopsy was scheduled for Tuesday morning, according to the Marin Independent Journal.

“Robin Williams passed away this morning. He has been battling severe depression of late,” said Williams’ publicist Mara Buxbaum to The Hollywood Reporter. “This is a tragic and sudden loss. The family respectfully asks for their privacy as they grieve during this very difficult time.”

Williams, a stand-up comedian who got his start in the Bay Area, moved on to acting soon after his star was on the rise and became a massive box office draw with movies such as Awakenings, The Fisher King and The Dead Poets Society. He won an Oscar in 1997 for his performance in the movie Good Will Hunting.

“I could not be more stunned by the loss of Robin Williams, mensch, great talent, acting partner, genuine soul,” tweeted Steve Martin (@SteveMartinToGo).

For an example of his comedic genius, here is a clip of him doing stand up in 2008.

For more on Williams’ death and the resulting investigation, follow the story on NewsFix.

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Kevin L. Jones

Kevin Jones is an interactive producer for KQED Arts. A graduate of UC Berkeley's Graduate School of Journalism, Kevin reported on news in the Bay Area at KTVU.com for six years before pursuing his dream of covering the local creative arts scene. In his spare time, he is an unabashed record geek who plays/records music whenever possible i.e., when he's not spending time with his wonderful wife and daughter.

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