Fecal Face Dot Gallery

It started as a ‘zine — a handmade book of photocopied art and words assembled by John Trippe, now owner/founder/director/curator of the quizzically named arty Web site Fecal Face Dot Com. Trippe amassed thousands of counterculture art-loving followers through the site, creating enough momentum to open a small gallery in Hayes Valley. Scoff at the name all you want, Fecal Face Dot Gallery is the newest local spot for art that appeals to snot-nosed kids and grown-up art snobs alike. It’s got a gross name, but it can be a family place.

The current show is not, at first glance, a drop-dead crazy amazing exhibit. It’s a tidy display of twenty 2- and 4-color prints created by Austin, TX, artist, Michael Michael Sieben, and Nat Swope of Bloom Press in Oakland. What is truly amazing about the show is that it stands for accessibility — art is not just for elite, fiscally frivolous collectors. In an interview on YouTube, Swope and Sieben said they wanted to show — through their ongoing collaboration Forever and Never — how easy it can be to make and buy art: limited edition, hand-printed pieces with substance made by artists who might also design board graphics for a living and have skate ramps in their backyards.

Sieben’s signature characters are ruddy and lovable and were the subject of a super cute music video for the band ((sounder)). Thanks to Fecal Face Dot Com, I’ve been following Sieben’s work online for a little while and I relate to the weariness that I see in his subjects. They have globular heads and extra long arms and arrows in their backs, illustrating how you might feel after a long, treacherous week of working (or partying). Speaking of partying, FFDG is clean and professional — there is nothing behind the counter but a laptop, a sink, and a keg.

There’s a new show every other week at Fecal Face Dot Gallery in May, so go there soon. Or, don’t. Be all judgmental about the poop moniker now, but you’ll go there eventually. At the very least, buy a print online for thirty dollars. Made in limited editions of 45, they have lovely sentiments. “Hug yourself,” according to my interpretation, or “Keep the dream alive.” “Learn from your mistakes, be they alcohol or skateboard-related.”

So, whatever, the San Francisco Chronicle scooped me. I was just waiting for the right show. To learn more about emerging local and international artistic talent, John Trippe’s sailboat, interesting art-related photos/videos/Web sites/things to check out, art news, and Trippe’s cat named Poo, visit fecal face dot com.

Next up at the gallery: Alexis MacKenzie and Jessica Cusik’s show opening May 17th and Tara Foley’s show opening June 6.

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Author

Kristin Farr

Kristin Farr is the creator and producer of KQED's Emmy Award-winning web video series, Art School, and she is a contributing editor for Juxtapoz magazine. She has interviewed many well-known contemporary artists including Miranda July, Daniel Clowes, David Shrigley, Olek, and JR. Kristin's artwork has been exhibited at galleries around the Bay Area including Fifty24SF, Anno Domini and The Bedford Gallery. Her FarrOut art app for iOS was released in 2013. She lives in the East Bay and her favorite color is all of them.

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